A point spread is a handicap applied to a favorite. The team most likely to win lays points, while an underdog gains points. The point spread hopes to find the most likely number that a favorite is predicted to win by in a team sport. Point spreads are often found in American football and basketball. Alternative lines in hockey and baseball use point spreads on 1.5.

Experience live sports like never before. ESPN+ features a selection of live games from MLB, MLS, Serie A, FA Cup, EFL and NHL. Get in on the action with Live UFC Fight Nights, 30+ Top Rank Boxing cards, Grand Slam tennis from Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open. Plus access to your favorite college sports like football, basketball, lacrosse, and more.
Activities offered by advertising links to other sites may be deemed an illegal activity in certain jurisdictions. Viewers are specifically warned that they should inquire into the legality of participating in any games and/or activities offered by such other sites. The owner of this website assumes no responsibility for the actions by and makes no representation or endorsement of any of these games and/or activities offered by the advertiser. As a condition of viewing this website viewers agree to hold the owner of this website harmless from any claims arising from the viewer’s participation in any of the games and/or activities offered by the advertiser.

On November 30, 2015, CBS Sports released a new logo in order to coincide with the network's coverage of Super Bowl 50. The network also created a new on-air graphics package that debuted as part of the network's Super Bowl week programming. Following the game, the graphics package began to be utilized across all of their programming events, including their joint production of NCAA March Madness with Turner Sports.[2][3] The Masters, which retains heavy production control over their event, continued to use the network's older graphical style originally unveiled in 2007 until 2019, when they debuted a new graphics package. Also, the network's Thursday Night Football game broadcasts continued to use the graphical style originally used since its debut in 2014 until its rights to that package expired in 2018.
Until now, bettors looking to place a wager on their favorite sports team had two unattractive options: either open an account on a black market site, or seek out a corner bookie. In both cases, the party taking wagers was doing so illegally, and because illegal bookies are working in an unregulated space, there is nothing preventing them from offering poor lines, refusing to pay out winnings, or banning players without a reputable cause.

Fox Sports Media Group formally announced the replacement of Speed with Fox Sports 1 on March 5, 2013, with a target launch date slated for August 17. The network airs content from Major League Baseball, the UFC, NASCAR, soccer (including the FIFA World Cup) and multiple college sports events (including owning rights to Big East basketball and its annual postseason basketball tournament at Madison Square Garden). As a competitor to ESPN's SportsCenter, the network created Fox Sports Live, described as a "24/7 news franchise providing around-the-clock coverage through regularly scheduled programs, hourly updates and an information-rich ticker that provides a network agnostic sports event television schedule."[36] Notable personalities on FS1 include Regis Philbin, Mike Tyson, Michael Strahan, Erin Andrews, as well as many other Fox Sports personalities.[37][38] On August 17, 2013, with little advanced promotion, the extreme sports-focused Fuel TV was rebranded as Fox Sports 2, a companion network serving primarily as an overflow channel for Fox Sports 1, along with providing supplementary sports coverage.[39] The networks launched on August 17, 2013.
Auburn University  California State University, Northridge  Georgetown University Marquette University  Northwestern University  San Diego State University Southern Methodist University  The Ohio State University  University of Arizona University of Maryland  University of Missouri  University of Notre Dame University of South Florida  University of Wisconsin

Sports bettors place their wagers either legally, through a bookmaker/sportsbook, or illegally through privately run enterprises. The term "book" is a reference to the books used by wagebrokers to track wagers, payouts, and debts. Many legal sportsbooks are found online, operated over the Internet from jurisdictions separate from the clients they serve, usually to get around various gambling laws (such as the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 in the United States) in select markets, such as Las Vegas, Nevada, or on gambling cruises through self-serve kiosks. They take bets "up-front", meaning the bettor must pay the sportsbook before placing the bet. Illegal bookies, due to the nature of their business, can operate anywhere but only require money from losing bettors and don't require the wagered money up front, creating the possibility of debt to the bookie from the bettor. This creates a number of other criminal elements, thus furthering their illegality.
×