The Cronje Affair was an India-South Africa Cricket match fixing scandal that went public in 2000.[57] It began in 1996 when the-then captain of the South African national cricket team, Hansie Cronje, was convinced by Mukesh "John" Gupta, an Indian bookmaker, to throw a match during a Test in Kanpur, India. The scheme was discovered when Delhi police recorded illegal dealings between Indian bookmaker Sanjay Chawla and Cronje. According to the Telegraph in 2010, Cronje was paid off a total of £65,000 from Gupta.[58]

Later in 1984, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the NCAA could no longer monopolize the rights to negotiate the contracts for college football games, allowing each individual school to negotiate broadcast deals of their choice. ESPN took full advantage and began to broadcast a large number of NCAA football games, creating an opportunity for fans to be able to view multiple games each weekend (instead of just one), the same deal that the NCAA had previously negotiated with TBS.[7] ESPN's breakthrough moment occurred in 1987, when it secured a contract with the NFL to broadcast eight games during that year's regular season – all of which aired on Sunday nights, marking the first broadcasts of Sunday NFL primetime games. ESPN's Sunday Night Football games would become the highest-rated NFL telecasts for the next 17 years (before losing the rights to NBC in 2006).[8] The channel's decision to broadcast NFL games on Sunday evenings actually resulted in a decline in viewership for the daytime games shown on the major broadcast networks, marking the first time that ESPN had been a legitimate competitor to NBC and CBS, which had long dominated the sports television market.


On April 26, 2017, approximately 100 ESPN employees were notified that their positions with the sports network had been terminated, among them athletes-turned-analysts Trent Dilfer and Danny Kanell, and noted journalists like NFL beat reporter Ed Werder and Major League Baseball expert Jayson Stark.[11] The layoffs came as ESPN continued to shed viewers, more than 10 million over a period of several years, while paying big money for the broadcast rights to such properties as the NFL, NBA and College Football Playoff.[12] Further cost-cutting measures taken include moving the studio operations of ESPNU to Bristol from Charlotte, North Carolina,[13] reducing its longtime MLB studio show Baseball Tonight to Sundays as a lead-in to the primetime game and adding the MLB Network-produced Intentional Talk to ESPN2's daily lineup.[14]

Nevada sportsbooks require bettors to deposit cash in sportsbooks with narrow exceptions. William Hill offers kiosks in more than 50 taverns in Nevada. Cash may also be deposited through PayNearMe at 217 convenience stores under the 7-Eleven flag. Station Casinos offers the Sports Connection prepaid card that accepts Visa, MasterCard, Discover and electronic checks.
On June 11, 2018, New Jersey became the third state to legalize sports betting, after Nevada and Delaware, with Gov. Phil Murphy signing the legislation into law.[21][23] Sports betting in New Jersey began when a sportsbook opened at Monmouth Park Racetrack on June 14, 2018.[27] Following this, sportsbooks opened at the casinos in Atlantic City and at Meadowlands Racetrack.[28][29]
FOX Sports is the umbrella entity representing Fox Corporation’s wide array of multi-platform US-based sports assets. FOX Sports includes national networks FS1, FS2 and FOX Deportes as well as FOX Soccer Plus, FOX College Sports and a majority stake in the Big Ten Network. FOX Sports has delivered the most watched television program, NFL’s America’s Game of the Week on FOX, for ten consecutive years.
Online sportsbook reviews serve an important role in the sports betting industry, most importantly for bettors themselves, and credible sports information websites are obliged to produce objective consumer reports on these betting sites. Why? Because there are rules and regulations that need to be followed in order to protect customers, and the unfortunate reality is there are a wide range of reputations out there from good to bad with mediocre somewhere in between.
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