The Cronje Affair was an India-South Africa Cricket match fixing scandal that went public in 2000.[57] It began in 1996 when the-then captain of the South African national cricket team, Hansie Cronje, was convinced by Mukesh "John" Gupta, an Indian bookmaker, to throw a match during a Test in Kanpur, India. The scheme was discovered when Delhi police recorded illegal dealings between Indian bookmaker Sanjay Chawla and Cronje. According to the Telegraph in 2010, Cronje was paid off a total of £65,000 from Gupta.[58]


Tonight the Reds will send Luis Castillo (1-1, 0.92 ERA) to the mound. The right-hander has been excellent in his first three starts of the season and tossed seven shutout innings of a 14-0 win against the Miami Marlins last time out. Castillo is 2-0 in his career against the Dodgers with only four runs (three earned) allowed while fanning 17 through 12 1/3 innings of work. 
No. At this time all online wagers must be done from within the state where the book originates, thus protecting the online books from any new interpretations of the Wire Act. So if Betfair goes live with a site in Pennsylvania, then players can only place wagers on that site from within the Keystone State. They may however be permitted to perform other functions, such as cashiering and account management from beyond state lines.
In order to play for big bucks at a land-based venue, or at all on internet sites, sports bettors will have to prove that they are who they say they are. Legal online sportsbooks, in particular, require that patrons verify their identities and banking information. Although this process may feel slightly over-the-top and intrusive, it’s the only real way to truly safeguard a player’s sensitive info. Black market sites have little incentive to protect a player’s identity, as they don’t have to answer to a governing body.
Money line: A wager where bettors choose one side of the other, without the use of a point spread. The favorite will have a minus (-) sign next to their name, and all money lines are based on $100. So if a team is -180, players will have to wager $180 to win $100. Likewise, underdogs will have a plus (+) sign next to their name. A +140 team will pay out $240 ($140 plus the original $100) should it win.
Unlike the case for in-house sign-up, states that offer true online sports betting won’t force players to visit a live book to sign up and load their accounts. Instead, they can usually do so from just about anywhere (real-money wagers are still restricted to within state lines). They also won’t be restricted to placing wagers exclusively on mobile devices, as most operators in these states either already offer their platforms for desktops or plan on it.
On August 31, 2013, CBS Sports rolled out its previous graphics and animation package that was first used in the network's coverage of Super Bowl XLVII. Additionally, in compliance with the Active Format Description #10 code, CBS Sports switched to a 16:9 aspect ratio letterbox presentation used for all sports programming, including the SEC on CBS and the NFL on CBS broadcasts.

Sports bettors place their wagers either legally, through a bookmaker/sportsbook, or illegally through privately run enterprises. The term "book" is a reference to the books used by wagebrokers to track wagers, payouts, and debts. Many legal sportsbooks are found online, operated over the Internet from jurisdictions separate from the clients they serve, usually to get around various gambling laws (such as the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 in the United States) in select markets, such as Las Vegas, Nevada, or on gambling cruises through self-serve kiosks. They take bets "up-front", meaning the bettor must pay the sportsbook before placing the bet. Illegal bookies, due to the nature of their business, can operate anywhere but only require money from losing bettors and don't require the wagered money up front, creating the possibility of debt to the bookie from the bettor. This creates a number of other criminal elements, thus furthering their illegality.
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