HSS is the exclusive choice for High Limit, premium players from around the globe, fueled by a unique network of international connections. From Monte Carlo in the Riviera to the biggest books in the U.K. and from the most influential sources Back East to the sharpest steam players in Las Vegas. Only the most select situations measure up for HSS clients, generally moving on just One Major Play per day. Discriminating, Disciplined, and Dominating the High Stakes Syndicate is the only choice for High Stakes Players.
The handicapping, sports odds information contained on this website is for entertainment purposes only. Please confirm the wagering regulations in your jurisdiction as they vary from state to state, province to province and country to country. Using this information to contravene any law or statute is prohibited. The site is not associated with nor is it endorsed by any professional or collegiate league, association or team. OddsShark does not target an audience under the age of 18. Please visit gambleaware.co.uk or gamcare.org.uk for guidelines on responsible gaming.
Some of the network's sports telecasts (most frequently, college football and Sunday afternoon NFL games, and the World Series) delay or outright pre-empt regularly scheduled local evening newscasts on Fox stations due to typical overruns past a set time block or pre-determined later start times; a few Fox affiliates that maintain news departments (such as WBRC in Birmingham, Alabama and WVUE-DT in New Orleans) have opted not to air or have cancelled early evening newscasts on Saturdays and Sundays due to frequent sports preemptions in that daypart, while others (such as WDAF-TV in Kansas City, Missouri) instead reschedule their weekend early evening news programs to an earlier timeslot if possible when Fox is scheduled to air an evening game or race.
Beginning with the 2003 NFL season, the banner was upgraded as part of a new graphics package. At first, the team abbreviations were replaced with team logos, and the scores were rendered in white within black parallelograms. Unlike the previous version, the FoxBox would alternate between a black rectangle and several black parallelograms; however, it reverted to being a black rectangle beginning with the 2004 NFL season, and the team logos would later be replaced with abbreviations in the respective teams' primary colors (the colorized team abbreviations would first be utilized on postseason baseball broadcasts that year). Whenever a team scores a point or a run, the team's score and logo would flash a few times.

Fox College Hoops – Gus Johnson, Tim Brando, Kevin Burkhardt, Justin Kutcher, Aaron Goldsmith, Scott Graham, Eric Collins, Dick Stockton, Joe Davis, Kevin Kugler, Brian Anderson, Brandon Gaudin, Brian Custer, Vince Welch, Jeff Levering, Bob Picozzi, Steve Physioc, Rich Waltz, Rich Ackerman, Dave Sims, Wayne Randazzo, Mike Monaco, Mike Hill, Dave O'Brien
Naskila Gaming in Livingston is currently just a high-stakes bingo hall and video gaming facility. It is presently embroiled in a court battle with the state of Texas, as lawmakers do not believe that the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas has legal right to open a gaming facility under the 1987 federal restoration law. The Tribe believes that they do have this right, under the more recent 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. Naskila Gaming is able to operate while the court battle ensues, though we will be updating this page as the situation develops
Despite having the ability to now operate and profit off of sports betting in Texas, lawmakers more than likely won’t take any action on this opportunity. Why? Well, both the House and Senate are controlled by a conservative majority. The GOP opposes expanded gambling as it poses not only a question of morality, but also tends to increase crime rates. While there’s no indications that crime rates would spike in Texas should they legalize sports betting, conservative party members aren’t willing to potentially alienate their constituents by taking that risk.
Sports bettors place their wagers either legally, through a bookmaker/sportsbook, or illegally through privately run enterprises. The term "book" is a reference to the books used by wagebrokers to track wagers, payouts, and debts. Many legal sportsbooks are found online, operated over the Internet from jurisdictions separate from the clients they serve, usually to get around various gambling laws (such as the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 in the United States) in select markets, such as Las Vegas, Nevada, or on gambling cruises through self-serve kiosks. They take bets "up-front", meaning the bettor must pay the sportsbook before placing the bet. Illegal bookies, due to the nature of their business, can operate anywhere but only require money from losing bettors and don't require the wagered money up front, creating the possibility of debt to the bookie from the bettor. This creates a number of other criminal elements, thus furthering their illegality.
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