Sports betting in Texas is not currently legal, and more than likely won’t be for a long time. Despite the fact that Texas lawmakers lose out on close to two and a half billion dollars annually to casinos in neighboring states, there is no indication that they plan to expand gambling in the Lone Star state. As neighboring states begin to legalize sports betting, expect that deficit to grow even larger.
New Jersey started accepting wagers on June 14, just three days after New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed the bill into law. Monmouth Park and Borgata Casino are the first two New Jersey properties to start taking wagers. The FanDuel Sportsbook at The Meadowlands launched a couple of weeks later. There are currently nine sportsbooks operational in the state with eight online and mobile apps.
In February 2011, FDU's PublicMind released a poll which showed that half (55%) of voters agreed "that people bet on sports games anyway, so government should allow it and tax it." On the other hand, approximately (37%) of New Jersey voters concurred that betting on sports is "a bad idea because it promotes too much gambling and can corrupt sports." Again, by a significant margin (70%-26%), voters who already engage in sports betting in office pools tend to be more supportive of legal sports betting than other voters.[11]
Another important source you can use to research online betting websites is social media. Every trustworthy online gambling site should have a presence on Twitter and Facebook as a valuable customer service tool. Following and/or “Liking” the sports betting site enables bettors to see how the company communicates and interacts with potential and current customers, giving them another level of trust and the necessary knowledge needed to make the right decision when the time comes to choose one. If a book is very responsive on social media, you can see that they really care about their customers and want to resolve issues in a timely and efficient manner.
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