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Some of the network's sports telecasts (most frequently, college football and Sunday afternoon NFL games, and the World Series) delay or outright pre-empt regularly scheduled local evening newscasts on Fox stations due to typical overruns past a set time block or pre-determined later start times; a few Fox affiliates that maintain news departments (such as WBRC in Birmingham, Alabama and WVUE-DT in New Orleans) have opted not to air or have cancelled early evening newscasts on Saturdays and Sundays due to frequent sports preemptions in that daypart, while others (such as WDAF-TV in Kansas City, Missouri) instead reschedule their weekend early evening news programs to an earlier timeslot if possible when Fox is scheduled to air an evening game or race.

Several additional states such as Louisiana, Connecticut, Mississippi,[30] Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, California, South Carolina, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Ohio, New York, and West Virginia,[31] began drafting bills to legalize sports betting soon after New Jersey and Delaware. Pennsylvania,[32] Rhode Island,[33] and West Virginia were able to pass legislation legalizing sports betting within their states.[34]
Because of this, sports betting for Texas residents is rather limited, for the time being. Land-based sports betting isn’t currently legal, but we here at sports betting Texas believe in the power of positivity, which is why we’ve gone ahead and included information about where sports betting in Texas may take place whenever it gets the green light. While we believe in the power of positivity, we also believe in the instant gratification. So in addition to providing speculative sports betting info for Texas residents, we’ve also included information about how you can legally bet on sports in Texas right now.
The heavily conservative mindset in the Texas legislature right now is going to carry over into the 2019 legislative session. Lawmakers who do introduce sports betting bills likely will not have the support needed to pass a law that would legalize Texas sports betting. That being said, anything can happen, and so we will diligently keep an eye on what happens during the next legislative session. Optimistically, there could be legal sports betting in Texas within the next year. Realistically, expect it to roll out within the next 3 to 5 years. It’s going to take a lot to make sports betting legal in Texas.
FOX Sports is the umbrella entity representing Fox Corporation’s wide array of multi-platform US-based sports assets. FOX Sports includes national networks FS1, FS2 and FOX Deportes as well as FOX Soccer Plus, FOX College Sports and a majority stake in the Big Ten Network. FOX Sports has delivered the most watched television program, NFL’s America’s Game of the Week on FOX, for ten consecutive years.
On June 26, 2018, WWE and Fox Sports announced a five-year agreement to air WWE SmackDown in a deal worth $205 million per year.[29][30] The agreement came as WWE's previous broadcast deal with NBCUniversal's USA Network to air both SmackDown and WWE Raw was set to expire. Fox had hoped to acquire Raw for the Fox network and SmackDown for Fox Sports 1.[31][32] However, amid a competitive bidding situation, NBCUniversal focused its efforts on renewing Raw, freeing up Fox to pursue SmackDown.[33] Under the new deal, SmackDown will move to Friday nights on Fox beginning on October 4, 2019.[34][35]
The KenPom and Sagarin rankings are both computer-based rankings systems which provide predictions for college basketball games. They are both highly influential amongst bettors, and the actual spreads used by sportsbooks tend to factor in their predictions. Often KenPom and Sagarin agree on what is likely to happen in a game, but they also diverge…
We have personally tested these sites ourselves, and find that they are extremely safe. They not only use the most up to date security software, but they also use encryption software that keeps your personal information between you and the person processing your payments. The sites we recommend are highly secure, offering the safest online sports betting in Texas.
Here the Dodgers will hand the ball to left-hander Clayton Kershaw (2018: 9-5, 2.73 ERA) for his season debut. It will no doubt give them a morale boost to have the three-time National League Cy Young Award winner back in action after missing the beginning of the season due to injury, but is he 100% fit? I like the price we get on the Reds to at the very least cover the runline here Monday night.

In November 2014, a poll found that there had been a major shift in attitudes towards sports betting in the United States, showing that 55% of Americans now favored legal sports betting, while 66% of respondents agreed that this should be regulated by state laws, as opposed to federal legislation.[17] The poll also suggested that 33% of respondents disagreed with the notion of legalization.


Six years later, as the league's television contracts for both the National Football Conference and American Football Conference divisions, and for the Sunday and Monday primetime football packages were up for renewal, Fox placed a bid for $1.58 billion to obtain the broadcast rights to the National Football Conference. On December 17, 1993, the NFL selected Fox's bid and signed a four-year contract with the network to award it the rights to televise regular season and playoff (as well as select preseason) games from the NFC, beginning with the 1994 season; the initial contract also included the exclusive U.S. television rights to broadcast Super Bowl XXXI in 1997.[3] The deal stripped CBS of football telecasts for the first time since 1955.
ESPN2 launched on October 1, 1993, it carried a broad mix of event coverage from conventional sports (such as auto racing, college basketball and NHL hockey) to extreme sports (such as BMX, skateboarding and motocross).[29] The "ESPN BottomLine," a ticker displaying sports news and scores during all programming that is now used by all of ESPN's networks, originated on ESPN2 in 1995.[30] In the late 1990s, ESPN2 was gradually reformatted to serve as a secondary outlet for ESPN's mainstream sports programming.[31]
That said, it is legal for Texas residents to place bets with offshore betting sites, such as the pair I’ve outlined below.  These sites are licensed and regulated by jurisdictions outside of the United States making them legal and allowing them to accept American bettors.  In fact, Bovada, our top rated betting site, actually only accepts American residents as this allows them to fully cater their sportsbook to the USA demographic.
There is also a money or decimal line tied to the alternative line. If the underdog only loses by one, then that side wins these alternative lines. It is likely that the side receiving the +1.5 will be the money line favorite. The side laying 1.5 runs or goals will be plus money. That is because winning by two in baseball and hockey is extremely difficult. A very strong team would have to play a very weak one for the 1.5 favorite to also lay money.

Many of the leading gambling bookmakers from the 1930s to the 1960s got their start during the prohibition era of the 1920s. They were often descendants of the influx of immigrants coming into the USA at this time. Although the common stereotype is that these bookies were of Italian descent, many leading bookies were of eastern European ancestry.[4]

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When the Fox Broadcasting Company launched in October 1986, the network's management, having seen how sports programming (in particular, soccer events) played a critical role in the growth of the British satellite service BSkyB, determined that sports would be the type of programming that would ascend Fox to a major network status the quickest; as a result, Fox tried to attract a professional football package to the network. In 1987, after ABC initially hedged on renewing its contract with the National Football League (NFL) for the television rights to Monday Night Football, Fox made an offer for the package at the same price that ABC had been paying at the time – about $13 million per game. However, partly due to the fact that Fox had yet to establish itself as a major network, the NFL decided to resume negotiations with ABC, with the two parties eventually agreeing to a new contract, keeping what was the crown jewel of the league's television broadcasts on that network (where it remained until 2006, when MNF moved to sister network ESPN as part of a contract that also saw NBC gain the Sunday Night Football package).
Later in 1984, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the NCAA could no longer monopolize the rights to negotiate the contracts for college football games, allowing each individual school to negotiate broadcast deals of their choice. ESPN took full advantage and began to broadcast a large number of NCAA football games, creating an opportunity for fans to be able to view multiple games each weekend (instead of just one), the same deal that the NCAA had previously negotiated with TBS.[7] ESPN's breakthrough moment occurred in 1987, when it secured a contract with the NFL to broadcast eight games during that year's regular season – all of which aired on Sunday nights, marking the first broadcasts of Sunday NFL primetime games. ESPN's Sunday Night Football games would become the highest-rated NFL telecasts for the next 17 years (before losing the rights to NBC in 2006).[8] The channel's decision to broadcast NFL games on Sunday evenings actually resulted in a decline in viewership for the daytime games shown on the major broadcast networks, marking the first time that ESPN had been a legitimate competitor to NBC and CBS, which had long dominated the sports television market.
You can make some nice cash betting on a No. 7 or No. 8 seed to upset a No. 2 or No. 1 in the first round of the Stanley Cup playoffs. Shoot, perhaps the Columbus Blue Jackets can knock off the historically good Tampa Bay Lightning this month after shockingly rallying for a Game 1 win in Tampa. However, I don't recommend those long-shot series upset wagers in the NBA.
There are two federal sports betting laws currently on the books in the United States: The Wire Act, and the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the UIGEA for short. These laws can be found with a simple google search, using their names or the keywords “federal sports betting laws”. They are posted online at a multitude of sites. You can also look at the legal code of the United States, under the year that the laws were passed for the complete verbiage. The Wire Act was passed in 1961, and the UIGEA was passed in 2006.
Sports betting is the activity of predicting sports results and placing a wager on the outcome. The frequency of sports bet upon varies by culture, with the vast majority of bets being placed on association football, American football, basketball, baseball, hockey, track cycling, auto racing, mixed martial arts, and boxing at both the amateur and professional levels. Sports betting can also extend to non-athletic events, such as reality show contests and political elections, and non-human contests such as horse racing, greyhound racing, and illegal, underground dog fighting.
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