CBS Sports Radio is a sports radio network that launched on September 4, 2012 with hourly sports news updates. It began offering a full 24-hour schedule of sports talk programming on January 2, 2013.[10] CBS Sports Radio although originally owned by CBS Radio is now owned directly by CBS Corporation and operated by Entercom, with Westwood One handling distribution and marketing of the network. Sports radio stations that are owned by Entercom and Cumulus Media carry part of the full schedule of programming, while eight Entercom-owned stations carry network programming throughout the day. In addition to carriage on terrestrial stations, CBS Sports Radio also streams its programming on the internet.[10]
Unlike the case for in-house sign-up, states that offer true online sports betting won’t force players to visit a live book to sign up and load their accounts. Instead, they can usually do so from just about anywhere (real-money wagers are still restricted to within state lines). They also won’t be restricted to placing wagers exclusively on mobile devices, as most operators in these states either already offer their platforms for desktops or plan on it.
Spread betting are wagers that are made against the spread. The spread, or line, is a number assigned by the bookmakers which handicaps one team and favors another when two teams play each other and one is perceived as being more likely to win. The favorite "takes" points from the final score and the underdog "gives" points. This number can also be in increments of half-a-point (.5) even though very few sports have .5 point scoring (i.e., The Ryder Cup)

For Super Bowl XXXVI in 2002, Fox Sports produced its first telecast in a 16:9, 480p enhanced-definition format marketed as "Fox Widescreen"; while promoted as having better quality than standard definition, and being the first U.S. sporting event produced completely in a widescreen format, it was not true high definition, but still matched the aspect ratio of HDTV sets.[41][42]
In a national poll released in December 2011, Fairleigh Dickinson University's PublicMind asked voters whether they “support or oppose changing the federal law to allow sports betting” in their respective states. Just as many voters approved (42%) as opposed (42%) allowing sports betting. However, voters who already live in households where family members (including themselves) engage in sports betting had a strongly favored legalization of sports betting (71%-23%), while voters in households where sports betting is not an activity, opposed legalization (46%-36%). Peter J. Woolley, professor of political science and director of the poll commented on the findings, “Gambling has become, for good or ill, a national industry, and you can bet that politicians and casinos all over the country are closely following New Jersey’s plans.”[8]
In June 2017, the Supreme Court of the United States announced that it would hear New Jersey's case, Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, in the fall of 2017, contradicting the position of the US Acting Solicitor General, Jeffrey Wall, who asked that the case not be heard in May 2017.[18] In September 2017, a poll conducted by the Washington Post and the University of Massachusetts Lowell shows 55% majority of adults in the U.S. approve of legalizing betting on pro sporting events.[19]

On January 31, 2018, the NFL announced a five-year agreement for the broadcasting rights for Thursday Night Football games. The announcement serves as the first long-term deal negotiated by the NFL to secure a network partner to broadcast Thursday night games starting in 2018.[27] The deal is reportedly worth an average of more than $660 million per year,[28] which is in addition to the $1.1 billion per year Fox already pays to broadcast NFC games on Sundays.
At the beginning of the 2010 NFL pre-season, Fox debuted a new graphics package for its football coverage – an upgraded version of the 2006 design with a "much more colorful 3D look." The new graphics also marked a migration to Vizrt hardware for CG, providing producers with a more streamlined workflow for graphics.[47] The new design would be rolled out for Fox's racing coverage and the Speed network in 2011, at the start of the 2011 MLB season (where both Fox and the FSN networks would begin using it as well, excluding SportSouth games simulcast by WPCH-TV and Root Sports – which used the previous FSN appearance), and on Fox Soccer.
The next major stepping stone for ESPN came over the course of a couple of months in 1984. During this time period, the American Broadcasting Company (ABC) purchased 100% of ESPN from the Rasmussens and Getty Oil.[6] Under Getty ownership, the channel was unable to compete for the television rights to major sports events contracts as its majority corporate parent would not provide the funding, leading ESPN to lose out for broadcast deals with the National Hockey League (to USA Network) and NCAA Division I college football (to TBS). For years, the NFL, NBA and Major League Baseball refused to consider cable as a means of broadcasting some of their games.[7] However, with the backing of ABC, ESPN's ability to compete for major sports contracts greatly increased, and gave it credibility within the sports broadcasting industry.

Despite having the ability to now operate and profit off of sports betting in Texas, lawmakers more than likely won’t take any action on this opportunity. Why? Well, both the House and Senate are controlled by a conservative majority. The GOP opposes expanded gambling as it poses not only a question of morality, but also tends to increase crime rates. While there’s no indications that crime rates would spike in Texas should they legalize sports betting, conservative party members aren’t willing to potentially alienate their constituents by taking that risk.


Sports betting has resulted in a number of scandals in sport, affecting the integrity of sports events through various acts including point shaving (players affecting the score by missing shots), spot-fixing (a player action is fixed), bad calls from officials at key moments, and overall match fixing (the overall result of the event is fixed). Examples include the 1919 World Series, the alleged (and later admitted) illegal gambling of former MLB player Pete Rose, and former NBA referee Tim Donaghy.
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