ESPN2 launched on October 1, 1993, it carried a broad mix of event coverage from conventional sports (such as auto racing, college basketball and NHL hockey) to extreme sports (such as BMX, skateboarding and motocross).[29] The "ESPN BottomLine," a ticker displaying sports news and scores during all programming that is now used by all of ESPN's networks, originated on ESPN2 in 1995.[30] In the late 1990s, ESPN2 was gradually reformatted to serve as a secondary outlet for ESPN's mainstream sports programming.[31]
Money line: A wager where bettors choose one side of the other, without the use of a point spread. The favorite will have a minus (-) sign next to their name, and all money lines are based on $100. So if a team is -180, players will have to wager $180 to win $100. Likewise, underdogs will have a plus (+) sign next to their name. A +140 team will pay out $240 ($140 plus the original $100) should it win.
CBS Sports Network is a sports-oriented American digital cable and satellite channel that is operated by CBS Corporation through CBS Sports. Launched as the National College Sports Network in 2002, then renamed as College Sports Television in 2003, CBS's then-parent company Viacom acquired the network in 2005 and later renamed it CBS College Sports Network in 2008. The network had always focused on college sports, but in 2011, CBS rebranded the network as CBS Sports Network as a move to reposition the network to include mainstream sports—including coverage of minor professional sports leagues such as the Arena Football League and Major League Lacrosse, although college sports are still aired frequently by the network.
ESPN Classic is a subscription television network that launched in 1995 as Classic Sports Network, founded by Brian Bedol and Steve Greenberg. ESPN Inc. purchased Classic Sports Network in 1997 for $175 million,[32] rebranding the channel to its current name the following year. The channel broadcasts notable archived sporting events (originally including events from past decades, but now focusing mainly on events from the 1990s and later), sports documentaries and sports-themed movies.

Auburn University California State University, Northridge Georgetown University Marquette University Northwestern University San Diego State University Southern Methodist University The Ohio State University University of Arizona University of Maryland University of Missouri University of Notre Dame University of South Florida University of Wisconsin
Sports betting has resulted in a number of scandals in sport, affecting the integrity of sports events through various acts including point shaving (players affecting the score by missing shots), spot-fixing (a player action is fixed), bad calls from officials at key moments, and overall match fixing (the overall result of the event is fixed). Examples include the 1919 World Series, the alleged (and later admitted) illegal gambling of former MLB player Pete Rose, and former NBA referee Tim Donaghy.

The sites that we recommend are regulated and authorized by the governments of several countries. We recommend sites that operate out of Canada, Costa Rica, Panama, and the United Kingdom, as they have been operating legal sports betting the longest. These sites accept US bettors legally and safely under the guidance of their own gaming commissions, which have been given operational powers by their local government.

While sports betting in Texas has not been given the green light to operate at land-based locations yet, we know that lawmakers will eventually have no choice but to legalize it eventually. When that does happen, we believe that it will likely be housed at a Native American casino. There is currently one Class II casino and one High-stakes bingo hall operating in the state. These seem to be the most likely venues for Texas sports betting.


Sports betting is the activity of predicting sports results and placing a wager on the outcome. The frequency of sports bet upon varies by culture, with the vast majority of bets being placed on association football, American football, basketball, baseball, hockey, track cycling, auto racing, mixed martial arts, and boxing at both the amateur and professional levels. Sports betting can also extend to non-athletic events, such as reality show contests and political elections, and non-human contests such as horse racing, greyhound racing, and illegal, underground dog fighting.
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