Odds for different outcomes in single bet are presented either in European format (decimal odds), UK format (fractional odds), or American format (moneyline odds). European format (decimal odds) are used in continental Europe, Canada, and Australia. They are the ratio of the full payout to the stake, in a decimal format. Decimal odds of 2.00 are an even bet. UK format (fractional odds) are used by British bookmakers. They are the ratio of the amount won to the stake - the solidus "/" is pronounced "to" for example 7/1 "seven to one". Fractional odds of 1/1 are an even bet. US format odds are the amount won on a 100 stake when positive and the stake needed to win 100 when negative. US odds of 100 are an even bet.

On June 11, 2018, New Jersey became the third state to legalize sports betting, after Nevada and Delaware, with Gov. Phil Murphy signing the legislation into law.[21][23] Sports betting in New Jersey began when a sportsbook opened at Monmouth Park Racetrack on June 14, 2018.[27] Following this, sportsbooks opened at the casinos in Atlantic City and at Meadowlands Racetrack.[28][29]
FOX Sports Saturday At The Races will be presented by America’s Best Racing, Runhappy and Claiborne Farm. Hosted by Greg Wolf, the live shows will include commentary, handicapping and racing analysis from a combination of FOX Sports, NYRA and XBTV personalities, among others. Oaklawn Park's racing analyst Nancy Holthus will be hosting Oaklawn's addition to FOX Sports Saturday At The Races!
Beginning in October 2010, the NFL broadcast theme became uniform for all Fox Sports properties beginning with the National League Championship Series that year and NASCAR races with the 2011 Budweiser Shootout. It is yet unknown if this includes the Fox Sports Networks affiliates, as their basketball, hockey, baseball and college football broadcasts continue to use their own distinct theme music.
The National Football League (NFL) remains the only sports league to maintain public opposition to sports betting, however critics have noted that with the move of the Oakland Raiders relocation to Las Vegas in 2019, the NFL has positioned itself for legalization, while simultaneously contradicting its long-held position that sports betting in NFL markets would lead to potential match-fixing.[47] Commissioner Roger Goodell agreed with Manfred in a July 2017 seminar that betting on in-game events, as opposed to the outcome of games, was a more palatable form of sports betting.[48]
Each professional handicapping service offers a different subscription service. However, most allow you to purchase picks for a single day, week, month, season or year. If you're looking to bet on a certain sport and only that sport, a seasonal subscription could prove to be beneficial. If you're looking to bet solely on MLB, it would make sense for you to buy a picks package from the end of March until the last game of the World Series to ensure that the entire baseball season is covered. If you have a general interest in sports betting then you may want to purchase picks for a day and see if you like the service.
We understand one thing that many sites do not. Not everyone wants the same thing from their betting experts. Many of our customers want strong data-driven analysis with each pick. Others want a full game breakdown, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each team. Some want detailed trend information and situational analysis.  A few are looking for parlays to really bring the excitement.  The majority just want to know how to take and don’t want to be bothered with the details.
TheSportsGeek.com is not an online gambling operator, or a gambling site of any kind. We are simply here to provide information about sports betting for entertainment purposes. Sports betting and gambling laws vary by jurisdiction. We are not able to verify the legality of the information we provide, or your ability to use any sites that are linked to on this site, for every combination of your location, the sites’ location, and the type of service those sites provide. It is your responsibility to verify such matters and to know and follow your local laws.
The heavily conservative mindset in the Texas legislature right now is going to carry over into the 2019 legislative session. Lawmakers who do introduce sports betting bills likely will not have the support needed to pass a law that would legalize Texas sports betting. That being said, anything can happen, and so we will diligently keep an eye on what happens during the next legislative session. Optimistically, there could be legal sports betting in Texas within the next year. Realistically, expect it to roll out within the next 3 to 5 years. It’s going to take a lot to make sports betting legal in Texas.
On June 11, 2018, New Jersey became the third state to legalize sports betting, after Nevada and Delaware, with Gov. Phil Murphy signing the legislation into law.[21][23] Sports betting in New Jersey began when a sportsbook opened at Monmouth Park Racetrack on June 14, 2018.[27] Following this, sportsbooks opened at the casinos in Atlantic City and at Meadowlands Racetrack.[28][29]

Naskila Gaming in Livingston is currently just a high-stakes bingo hall and video gaming facility. It is presently embroiled in a court battle with the state of Texas, as lawmakers do not believe that the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas has legal right to open a gaming facility under the 1987 federal restoration law. The Tribe believes that they do have this right, under the more recent 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. Naskila Gaming is able to operate while the court battle ensues, though we will be updating this page as the situation develops
Spread betting are wagers that are made against the spread. The spread, or line, is a number assigned by the bookmakers which handicaps one team and favors another when two teams play each other and one is perceived as being more likely to win. The favorite "takes" points from the final score and the underdog "gives" points. This number can also be in increments of half-a-point (.5) even though very few sports have .5 point scoring (i.e., The Ryder Cup)
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