For Super Bowl XXXVI in 2002, Fox Sports produced its first telecast in a 16:9, 480p enhanced-definition format marketed as "Fox Widescreen"; while promoted as having better quality than standard definition, and being the first U.S. sporting event produced completely in a widescreen format, it was not true high definition, but still matched the aspect ratio of HDTV sets.[41][42]
Experience live sports like never before. ESPN+ features a selection of live games from MLB, MLS, Serie A, FA Cup, EFL and NHL. Get in on the action with Live UFC Fight Nights, 30+ Top Rank Boxing cards, Grand Slam tennis from Wimbledon, US Open and Australian Open. Plus access to your favorite college sports like football, basketball, lacrosse, and more.
Sports betting in Texas is not currently legal, and more than likely won’t be for a long time. Despite the fact that Texas lawmakers lose out on close to two and a half billion dollars annually to casinos in neighboring states, there is no indication that they plan to expand gambling in the Lone Star state. As neighboring states begin to legalize sports betting, expect that deficit to grow even larger.
ESPN has been criticized for focusing too much on men's college and professional sports, and very little on women's sports or extreme sports.[53] Ice hockey and soccer fans have also criticized ESPN for not giving their respective sports more coverage.[54][55] Other criticism has focused on ethnicity in ESPN's varying mediated forms, as well as carriage fees and issues regarding the exportation of ESPN content.[56] Some critics argue that ESPN's success is their ability to provide other enterprise and investigative sports news while competing with other hard sports-news-producing outlets such as Yahoo! Sports and Fox Sports.[57] Some scholars have challenged ESPN's journalistic integrity calling for an expanded standard of professionalism to prevent biased coverage and conflicts of interest.[58]
In February 2011, FDU's PublicMind released a poll which showed that half (55%) of voters agreed "that people bet on sports games anyway, so government should allow it and tax it." On the other hand, approximately (37%) of New Jersey voters concurred that betting on sports is "a bad idea because it promotes too much gambling and can corrupt sports." Again, by a significant margin (70%-26%), voters who already engage in sports betting in office pools tend to be more supportive of legal sports betting than other voters.[11]
Sports betting has resulted in a number of scandals in sport, affecting the integrity of sports events through various acts including point shaving (players affecting the score by missing shots), spot-fixing (a player action is fixed), bad calls from officials at key moments, and overall match fixing (the overall result of the event is fixed). Examples include the 1919 World Series, the alleged (and later admitted) illegal gambling of former MLB player Pete Rose, and former NBA referee Tim Donaghy.
Several additional states such as Louisiana, Connecticut, Mississippi,[30] Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, California, South Carolina, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Ohio, New York, and West Virginia,[31] began drafting bills to legalize sports betting soon after New Jersey and Delaware. Pennsylvania,[32] Rhode Island,[33] and West Virginia were able to pass legislation legalizing sports betting within their states.[34]

Naskila Gaming in Livingston is currently just a high-stakes bingo hall and video gaming facility. It is presently embroiled in a court battle with the state of Texas, as lawmakers do not believe that the Alabama-Coushatta Tribe of Texas has legal right to open a gaming facility under the 1987 federal restoration law. The Tribe believes that they do have this right, under the more recent 1988 Indian Gaming Regulatory Act. Naskila Gaming is able to operate while the court battle ensues, though we will be updating this page as the situation develops


In a different study released by FDU’s PublicMind in October 2011, results showed that New Jersey voters thought legalizing sports betting in New Jersey was a good idea. Half of New Jersey voters (52%) said that they approved the idea of legalizing sports betting at Atlantic City casinos and racetracks, 31% opposed it. In addition, there was a significant gender split: a majority of men approved of the idea by a wide margin (65-21), while only 39% of women approved and 41% opposed.[9] The October results were stable, reflecting an earlier poll in April 2011 where New Jersey voters approved the legalization of sports betting in the state by a margin of 53%-30%. However, nearly two-thirds (66%) of voters were not aware of the upcoming statewide referendum on the issue. Age proved to be a divide: voters between the ages 18 and 34 were more likely to approve of sports betting than were older voters. Dr. Woolley commented: "But... younger voters... are far less likely to vote than other voters... As always, a lot depends on who actually shows up to vote."[10]
Unlike Las Vegas, where you can physically visit a sportsbook at a casino resort, online gambling sites and sportsbooks are essentially virtual casinos that accept real money to wager on real sporting events. However, this does not mean an online sportsbook’s address is only located on the internet. Any reputable online book will have a physical address located on its website along with a toll-free telephone number you can use to call them and ask questions if needed. Some will even have an FAQ you can review to help you feel more comfortable about betting there.
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