A new graphics package for Fox Sports broadcasts was introduced for Fox's NASCAR coverage leading up to the 2014 Daytona 500. Fox Sports Midwest producer Max Leinwand described the look as being "cleaner" than the previous design.[49] The design has also been used to introduce new design conventions for some of Fox's graphics; for NASCAR, the running order ticker was replaced by a leaderboard-style display that was initially displayed as a vertical sidebar.[49][50] MLB uses a score bug at the bottom-right (initially at the bottom-left) of the screen instead of the top-left, while NFL utilized a top-left score bug with a layout similar to the one used 2010 to 2011.
The 2004 comedy film DodgeBall: A True Underdog Story gently lampoons the channel's multiple outlets by referencing the fictional ESPN8, "The Ocho",[47] a reference to a nickname formerly used by ESPN2, "the Deuce". ESPNU was rebranded ESPN8 The Ocho on August 8, 2017, airing obscure competitions such as disc golf, kabaddi, arm wrestling and roller derby.[48] On August 8, 2018, the special returned on ESPN2, featuring competitions such as jousting, lightsaber fighting, ultimate frisbee, spikeball, lawn mower racing, roller derby and chess boxing.[49]
Watching and handicapping college and pro football the past 30 years has left a lasting impression on preparation, poise and perseverance. Understanding strengths and weaknesses leads to a very profitable hobby that turned into a profession. Handicapping daily takes a detailed understanding of rosters and injuries. I have a proven track record with my daily free plays and documented daily winners. Play Kenny Towers!
Fox College Hoops – Gus Johnson, Tim Brando, Kevin Burkhardt, Justin Kutcher, Aaron Goldsmith, Scott Graham, Eric Collins, Dick Stockton, Joe Davis, Kevin Kugler, Brian Anderson, Brandon Gaudin, Brian Custer, Vince Welch, Jeff Levering, Bob Picozzi, Steve Physioc, Rich Waltz, Rich Ackerman, Dave Sims, Wayne Randazzo, Mike Monaco, Mike Hill, Dave O'Brien
On April 26, 2017, approximately 100 ESPN employees were notified that their positions with the sports network had been terminated, among them athletes-turned-analysts Trent Dilfer and Danny Kanell, and noted journalists like NFL beat reporter Ed Werder and Major League Baseball expert Jayson Stark.[11] The layoffs came as ESPN continued to shed viewers, more than 10 million over a period of several years, while paying big money for the broadcast rights to such properties as the NFL, NBA and College Football Playoff.[12] Further cost-cutting measures taken include moving the studio operations of ESPNU to Bristol from Charlotte, North Carolina,[13] reducing its longtime MLB studio show Baseball Tonight to Sundays as a lead-in to the primetime game and adding the MLB Network-produced Intentional Talk to ESPN2's daily lineup.[14]
Head-to-Head. In these bets, bettor predicts competitors results against each other and not on the overall result of the event. One example are Formula One races, where you bet on two or three drivers and their placement among the others. Sometimes you can also bet a “tie”, in which one or both drivers either have the same time, drop out, or get disqualified.

On April 26, 2017, approximately 100 ESPN employees were notified that their positions with the sports network had been terminated, among them athletes-turned-analysts Trent Dilfer and Danny Kanell, and noted journalists like NFL beat reporter Ed Werder and Major League Baseball expert Jayson Stark.[11] The layoffs came as ESPN continued to shed viewers, more than 10 million over a period of several years, while paying big money for the broadcast rights to such properties as the NFL, NBA and College Football Playoff.[12] Further cost-cutting measures taken include moving the studio operations of ESPNU to Bristol from Charlotte, North Carolina,[13] reducing its longtime MLB studio show Baseball Tonight to Sundays as a lead-in to the primetime game and adding the MLB Network-produced Intentional Talk to ESPN2's daily lineup.[14]

Another form of futures betting involves the over/under on the number of games a particular team will win in the regular season. This type of wager is typically found on pro football and major league baseball, and sometimes on pro basketball. For example, the over/under on the Yankees may be 93 wins. If the Yankees go on to win 94 or more games, the "over" is a winner. If they win 92 or fewer games, the "under" is a winner. If they win exactly 93, the bet is a push and tickets are refunded.
In July 2018, FanDuel closed a deal with Paddy Power Betfair, merging with Betfair US, TVG, and DRAFT, to become part of the FanDuel group. FanDuel’s first stop was at the Meadowlands in New Jersey, where it became the horse racing venues forward facing sports betting brand. This was followed by it opening a land-based book at The Greenbrier Resort and Casino in West Virginia, an online sports betting site and mobile app in New Jersey, and a physical sportsbook at the Valley Forge Casino Resort in Pennsylvania.
If you are already familiar with wagering, you can learn how to improve your sports handicapping. We have tips on general strategy as well as those on how to beat the individual sports.  If you try to go at it alone then it is going to be a costly education learning the ins and outs of gambling.  Instead, you can skip the heartache and loss and skip straight to the winner’s circle.  Get your education here for free, it won’t cost you a dime.
You’ll also find the fastest live lines at Bovada than any other sportsbook. Fans of live betting know that it’s all about speed. The faster those lines are presented, the more action you can get in on. Live betting is just one of the many perks that make Bovada a world-class sportsbook. You’ll find tons of wagering options available for you at the pace that you prefer.
Beginning with the 2006 NFL season, the scoring banner was upgraded again. This time, real-time scores from around the league were included as a permanent fixture on the extreme right side of the bar, while the banner's coloring changed to the colors of the team currently in possession of the ball (this coloring scheme was seen only on football broadcasts). The banner no longer flashed after the scoring of runs, touchdowns or field goals. During baseball broadcasts, the diamond graphic appeared in middle-justification and was slimmed down to just the three main bases, unlike other implements which included home plate. This banner, after first being used for NFL broadcasts in 2006, was eventually expanded to Bowl Championship Series, NASCAR and baseball broadcasts; baseball telecasts, however, continued to use the late-2005 scoring banners and graphics in 2007. In 2008, Fox NASCAR introduced a new camera embedded between turns one and two on the various tracks; it was soon known as "Digger Cam", unveiled alongside a gopher mascot named Digger. For the 2009 season, the 2006 graphics package was dropped entirely for Fox's baseball telecasts and replaced with the new Fox Sports Net graphics, which had debuted on baseball telecasts across FSN's affiliates that season. These were later repositioned for widescreen in July 2010, when Fox Sports began presenting all of its high definition programming content in the 16:9 aspect ratio, with letterboxing on standard definition feeds relayed to pay television providers.

ESPN2 launched on October 1, 1993, it carried a broad mix of event coverage from conventional sports (such as auto racing, college basketball and NHL hockey) to extreme sports (such as BMX, skateboarding and motocross).[29] The "ESPN BottomLine," a ticker displaying sports news and scores during all programming that is now used by all of ESPN's networks, originated on ESPN2 in 1995.[30] In the late 1990s, ESPN2 was gradually reformatted to serve as a secondary outlet for ESPN's mainstream sports programming.[31]
Bill Rasmussen conceived the concept of ESPN in late May 1978, after he was fired from his job with the World Hockey Association's New England Whalers. One of the first steps in Bill and his son Scott's (who had also been let go by the Whalers) process was finding land to build the channel's broadcasting facilities. The Rasmussens first rented office space in Plainville, Connecticut. However, the plan to base ESPN there was put on hold because a local ordinance prohibiting buildings from bearing rooftop satellite dishes. Available land area was quickly found in Bristol, Connecticut (where the channel remains headquartered to this day), with funding to buy the property provided by Getty Oil, which purchased 85% of the company from Bill Rasmussen on February 22, 1979, in an attempt to diversify the company's holdings. This helped the credibility of the fledgling company, however there were still many doubters to the viability of their sports channel concept. Another event that helped build ESPN's credibility was securing an advertising agreement with Anheuser-Busch in the spring of 1979; the company invested $1 million to be the "exclusive beer advertised on the network."[6]
Rush Street Gaming refused to sit around and wait for PA to launch online casinos and sports betting. Instead, the company launched the PlaySugarHouse brand in New Jersey. First, it was an online casino, then an online sportsbook followed in 2018. Both SugarHouse Casino and Rivers Casino in PA will benefit from the head start, especially when it comes to mobile betting. As for retail, the casinos are both conveniently located in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, respectively, and are poised to be popular places to watch the local pro teams and wager.
After college Tony was hired by one of the largest sportsbooks in Las Vegas, analyzing and improving their handicapping processes. Having not grown up watching mainstream American sports, Tony was able to take an unbiased, purely mathematical approach to predicting games. Tony is considered a hidden gem in the sports handicapping world. A true talent with the ability to provide solid returns for his customers.
While strikeouts per nine innings have increased in dramatic fashion the last half decade this trend will not continue. Expect less "swinging for the fences" with a focus on a higher percentage of contact by a hitter.  The theory of putting the ball in play and placing pressure on defenses has recently found success. The Kansas City Royals won the 2015 World Series with the philosophy.  Those same Royals stole bases and had a three headed monster in the bullpen.   

ESPN broadcasts primarily from studio facilities located in Bristol, Connecticut. The network also operates offices in Miami, New York City, Seattle, Charlotte, and Los Angeles. James Pitaro currently serves as chairman of ESPN, a position he has held since March 5, 2018 due to the resignation of John Skipper on December 18, 2017 (who succeeded George Bodenheimer as president in 2012).[1] While ESPN is one of the most successful sports networks, there has been much criticism of ESPN, which includes accusations of biased coverage,[2] conflict of interest, and controversies with individual broadcasters and analysts.
Future wagers. While all sports wagers are by definition on future events, bets listed as "futures" generally have a long-term horizon measured in weeks or months; for example, a bet that a certain NFL team will win the Super Bowl for the upcoming season. Such a bet must be made before the season starts in September, and winning bets will not pay off until the conclusion of the Super Bowl in January or February (although many of the losing bets will be clear well before then and can be closed out by the book). Odds for such a bet generally are expressed in a ratio of units paid to unit wagered. The team wagered upon might be 50-1 to win the Super Bowl, which means that the bet will pay 50 times the amount wagered if the team does so. In general, most sports books will prefer this type of wager due to the low win-probability, and also the longer period of time in which the house holds the player's money while the bet is pending.
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