Tom Hatfield of Razor Sharp Sports has been a top sports handicapper and has been seen and heard on national sports radio & TV shows since 1993. He has taken his knowledge of sports, combined with technology to give him the added advantage to be the sharpest handicapper in the country. Razor Sharp Sports has become the most educated sports service in the country, offering free football picks, free basketball picks, and free baseball picks all year long. Tom has hosted and appeared on the FreePlays.com Radio Show. He hosts the Fantasy King Sports Hour and has also appeared on the Pro Line Sports Show on the USA Network.


The bookmaker functions as a market maker for sports wagers, most of which have a binary outcome: a team either wins or loses. The bookmaker accepts both wagers, and maintains a spread (the vigorish) which will ensure a profit regardless of the outcome of the wager. The Federal Wire Act of 1961 was an attempt by the US government to prevent illegal bookmaking.[2] However, this Act does not apply to other types of online gambling.[3] The Supreme Court has not ruled on the meaning of the Federal Wire Act as it pertains to online gambling.
Since September 2006, ESPN has been integrated with the sports division of sister broadcast network ABC, with sports events televised on that network airing under the banner ESPN on ABC;[18][19] much of ABC's sports coverage since the rebranding has become increasingly limited to secondary coverage of sporting events whose broadcast rights are held by ESPN (such as NBA games, and the X Games and its related qualifying events) as well as a limited array of event coverage not broadcast on ESPN (most notably, the NBA Finals).

In July 2018, FanDuel closed a deal with Paddy Power Betfair, merging with Betfair US, TVG, and DRAFT, to become part of the FanDuel group. FanDuel’s first stop was at the Meadowlands in New Jersey, where it became the horse racing venues forward facing sports betting brand. This was followed by it opening a land-based book at The Greenbrier Resort and Casino in West Virginia, an online sports betting site and mobile app in New Jersey, and a physical sportsbook at the Valley Forge Casino Resort in Pennsylvania.
As an illustration, let's look at Super Bowl futures. Sports books list each NFL team with corresponding odds to win the Super Bowl. For example, the Ravens may be 5-1, the Redskins 12-1, the Cardinals 100-1, etc. If you place $10 on the Redskins and they go on to win the Super Bowl, you collect $120 plus your $10 back for a total payoff of $130. It does not matter whether your team covers the point spread in the Super Bowl. For the purposes of future book betting, the team has to win only the Super Bowl.
HSS is the exclusive choice for High Limit, premium players from around the globe, fueled by a unique network of international connections. From Monte Carlo in the Riviera to the biggest books in the U.K. and from the most influential sources Back East to the sharpest steam players in Las Vegas. Only the most select situations measure up for HSS clients, generally moving on just One Major Play per day. Discriminating, Disciplined, and Dominating the High Stakes Syndicate is the only choice for High Stakes Players.
An occasional joke used in comedic television and film involves people getting ESP (the common abbreviation for extrasensory perception, that was coincidentally the working abbreviation for the channel prior to its launch) confused with ESPN, often including someone saying a sentence along the lines of "I know these kinds of things, I've got ESPN." There are also at least 22 children that are named after the network.[51][52]
Sports bettors place their wagers either legally, through a bookmaker/sportsbook, or illegally through privately run enterprises. The term "book" is a reference to the books used by wagebrokers to track wagers, payouts, and debts. Many legal sportsbooks are found online, operated over the Internet from jurisdictions separate from the clients they serve, usually to get around various gambling laws (such as the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act of 2006 in the United States) in select markets, such as Las Vegas, Nevada, or on gambling cruises through self-serve kiosks. They take bets "up-front", meaning the bettor must pay the sportsbook before placing the bet. Illegal bookies, due to the nature of their business, can operate anywhere but only require money from losing bettors and don't require the wagered money up front, creating the possibility of debt to the bookie from the bettor. This creates a number of other criminal elements, thus furthering their illegality.
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